Custody Evaluations in New Jersey: Put your best foot forward

Custody Evaluations in New Jersey: Put your best foot forward

Bergen County Custody EvaluationsEntering into a Custody Proceeding can be extremely stressful as one of your most valued possessions, your children, is at stake. Often Child Custody battles are long and taxing, leaving all parties involved with a sense of unease. During the process it is extremely important that you are educated on how to properly prepare for a custody evaluation and take the appropriate steps to insure you are properly represented during the process. Below we will discuss some steps to take on how to best represent yourself in a Custody Evaluation.

One of the most important steps you can take after obtaining counsel is to provide your lawyer with as much information as possible. Custody Evaluation Specialists will be presented with a plethora of information about you, your spouse, your children and your family during this process. In order for your lawyer to be as efficient and effective as possible you will need to supply all relevant information. This will enable your lawyer to put you in a position to achieve the most positive outcome. Under most circumstances a custody lawyers will ask for a list of all the important individuals in your child’s life and their contact information. This list often includes family members, babysitters, teachers, neighbors friends etc.

Proper and Punctual Documentation Throughout the Process

Your attorney will also ask for a series of documents that pertain to your custody evaluation. These documents can include things like your child’s health records, correspondence with your spouse in regards to custody and your correspondence with others who play an active role in your child’s life.

Another important set of information to provide to your attorney is an exact schedule of how you spend time with your children and their general routine. This schedule should include details like when your children go to school, their activities following school, when you are responsible for watching them, when another caregiver or spouse is responsible for watching them, etc. This is an important aspect of the custodial battle because ultimately the evaluator will be looking to recommend an solution that will promote the most favorable and productive environment for the child.

Do’s and Dont’s in front of the Evaluator

Going through the custody evaluation is stressful; everyone including the evaluators themselves are very aware of the intensity of this process. However, there are a few things to keep in mind so that you deliver the most favorable and accurate experience during this process.

DO’s

  • Present yourself as neat and clean individual (Dress sharp be groomed)
  • Be punctual to your appointment
  • Be truthful: the evaluators will be fact checking your statements. Honesty is the best policy
  • Show sincere interest in the welfare of your child
  • Acknowledge both your strengths and weaknesses as a parent
  • Acknowledge that a relationship with both parents is positive for the child(ren)
  • Follow up promptly if asked to proivide paperwork or verification

Dont’s

  • Do not get visible angry or threaten your former spouse
  • Do not be disrespectful to the moderator
  • Do not harass the Moderator
  • Ask the Moderator to fulfill the role of a therapist or psychologist
  • Be late or miss appointments
  • Coach your children through the process

The attorneys of Townsend, Tomaio & Newmark handle complex divorce cases involving child custody, child support, division of assets, and parenting time across Bergen County, including: Hackensack, Teaneck, Fort Lee, and Paramus. Make the right move for your future and the future of your children. Call us today for a free consultation, 201-397-1750. Our priority today, is protecting your tomorrow.

 

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